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44 Comments

Linda Griffin
November 2, 2014 at 5:56 pm
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Eddie – amazing how you take seemingly mundane life events to cherished memories. True talent – you are special! :o) xoxo



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 9:56 pm
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    Linda- Thank you so much for such a beautiful compliment. I appreciate your support and voice for Farm Stories so much!!! xoxo

Carla Willis
November 2, 2014 at 6:07 pm
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Oh my goodness, this is superb!! My grandma Beadles could be described a lot like her. Small, dark skinned, she was 1/4 Indian everyone said. Humped over and arthritic from years of hard work on a small farm and giving birth and caring for 9 children. Eddie, Hannah saw something we all see! xoxo



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 9:57 pm
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    Carla- I love how Hannah had the insight knowing walking kept he going. She was ahead of her time. Thank you always for your support and voice. xoxo

Janet Borelli
November 2, 2014 at 6:46 pm
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A great story! What happened to Hannah? Did she pass in Winslow? Did she have family? What did they find in her home that could help explain this wonderful, mysterious woman?
Can’t wait for the next story!



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 10:00 pm
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    Janet- Thank you so much for your support and voice. Hannah passed in Winslow and the only family I know of is her brother. I’ve been so happy that so many back home have remembered and responded. xoxo

Brad Hindahl
November 2, 2014 at 6:56 pm
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Awesome story!



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 10:00 pm
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    Thanks for reading and supporting Farm Stories Brad!!!

Tricia Wornica
November 2, 2014 at 7:00 pm
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Wonderful story as always! Was she by chance, the lady that lived in the cabin across from us on the State Forest road? I remember being at my Grandparents home up the road, when her cabin caught fire. My Grandpa went to try to help. I don’t remember what ever happened to her, but I do remember her exactly as you described. xoxo 🙂



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 10:03 pm
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    Tricia- I would believe that cabin would have been across the street from you. I remember it being deep in the woods but that could just be my childhood mind. Back then everything was more overgrown than today. Thanks you so much for reading and supporting Farm Stories!!!! xoxo

Kelly Montgomery
November 2, 2014 at 7:31 pm
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Wonderful story Eddie, brought tears to my eyes!!



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 10:04 pm
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    Kelly- Thank you so much!!!! Your voice and support mean so much to me!

Kathy Dispenza
November 2, 2014 at 7:32 pm
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God sent her to you for a reason! 🙂



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 10:05 pm
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    Kathy- I believe you are right. Thank you for support Farm Stories!!! xo

Peggy Vacanti
November 2, 2014 at 7:36 pm
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I loved that story!



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 10:06 pm
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    Peggy- Thank you so much!!! Your support means so much too me!!!

Sheli Cockerham Dillon
November 2, 2014 at 8:51 pm
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<3
XOXOXO!



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 10:07 pm
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    Sheli- As always your support and voice mean so much to me. I’m truly grateful. xo

Jenny Burns
November 2, 2014 at 9:24 pm
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as I read this story, I could see her walking along side the road. I could remember also stopping and mom asking her if she needed a ride and feeling badly when she said no. I just wonder if it’s my memory…or if you have once again, painted something so strongly in my mind, that I feel it must have happened to me as well!!! genius.



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 10:08 pm
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    LJB- I’m overwhelmed how many remember Hannah. Thank you for your voice, support and love!!!
    xoxo

Mary
November 2, 2014 at 10:04 pm
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A wonderful story. We had a George in Wabash Count. She reminds me of him.



    chromedust
    November 2, 2014 at 10:09 pm
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    Mary- Thank you for reading and supporting. I happy Hannah triggered your memory of George!!!
    xoxo

Frieda Bolin
November 2, 2014 at 11:53 pm
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Eddie, thank you so much for this story—-I had forgotten all about Hannah—thank you for reminding me of a time past–one that I should not so easily forgotten!



    chromedust
    November 3, 2014 at 1:42 am
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    Frieda – Your words make me smile so BIG!!! There is no bigger compliment than something I’ve written has caused another to remember, feel, and reflect. Thank you so very much for reading and adding your voice to Farm Stories….

AngieatEatHere
November 3, 2014 at 12:31 am
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How beautiful, Eddie: another thoughtful glimpse into the complex intricacies of the human connections and reminder of how nuanced are we and our connections….this softer view of your father, the compelling portrait of this interesting woman and its evocation of memories many of us have of an old or eccentric person, gently warped by the view through our childhoods. I wonder how many of us have been touched and perhaps shifted on our paths by someone who saw a glimpse of something and expressed, “I see you, and you are special” in unique ways. And I am reminded of something I read once about dogs, my memory perhaps being pulled forward by envisioning Hannah’s cataract-clouded vision and the likelihood that she was guided by some sense other than visual.

The piece I read was along these lines (and I wish I could cite the source, but -tricky memory! – it eludes me. We often think our dogs can hear so well that they recognize the sounds of our cars or footsteps coming up the drive or the steps, and that this is why they meet us at the door or the gate when we come home. Experiments have been done, however, in which the possibility of hearing has been eliminated and the time between departure from one location and arrival at home is such that it would not be possible for a dog to hear you coming. There is a theory that they can’t hear it or see it, or smell you, or in any other physical way perceive your arrival in advance. It may be that there is a physical perception, but one humans don’t have. But very often, dogs DO know. You leave your office, and your dog may go and sit by the door, waiting out the 45 minutes of your commute. It’s documented. You finish shopping, pick up the dry cleaning and visit with an acquaintance on your walk home. But from the time of your intention to head home (after I pick up a loaf of bread, after I stop to get that sweater I meant to pick up last week, after I visit with Mrs. Harrison as she passes on the sidewalk), your dog has sensed that intention, and goes happily to sit by the window or watch by the gate. Whatever it is and however it happens, there is knowledge we can’t explain.

Of course I am not equating Hannah with dogs except in the most wonderful context. I believe she had the gift of a sort of insight common to many animals but only rarely gifted to adult humans…as children we may sense these gifts of insight and, lacking any ability to articulate, use words like “witch”. But I believe Hannah could see “special” in you as easily as those of us looking at your picture might see a tall man dressed in black. I believe it must have been self-evident to Hannah. How brave she was to do more than simply see it, but to call it out in public, and to honor it every year.

Apologies for the verbose commentary. Think of it as my way of saying, Keep writing. Oh, DO keeping writing. xo



    chromedust
    November 3, 2014 at 1:51 am
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    Angie – This is so incredibly beautiful. Sometimes it seems in children, someone like Hannah and in animals. There is a simplicity and purity that allows them to see what others sometimes can’t. I’ve thought, talked and told stories about Hannah my entire life. She was special.
    Thank you for adding your beautiful voice to Farm Stories. It truly means so much to me….. xoxoxo

Jo Ann Brewster Radcliff
November 3, 2014 at 1:24 am
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I had forgotten Hannah, I never saw her much, but her brother(he might have been her husband), Harry use to come to Thompson’s grocery. I was young, and thought he was at least 100 years old.
Thank you so much for this story, and bringing back memories of the good times.



    chromedust
    November 3, 2014 at 1:59 am
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    Jo Ann – Thank you so much for reading Farm Stories and adding your voice. There is nothing better you could say than having read something I wrote made you remember, reflect and smile. Your support means so much to me!!!!

Terenda Wyant
November 3, 2014 at 2:16 am
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I don’t remember Hannah but I loved the story! There are so many that have passed and on and it is wonderful to read about them!!!!



    chromedust
    November 3, 2014 at 4:28 am
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    Terenda – Thank you for reading, support and sharing your voice!!! xo

Evelyn Marie Aldridge
November 3, 2014 at 2:38 am
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Really enjoyed reading your story. Also brought back memories that (my family, the Cooks) also saw her on the way to Winslow. And her tobacco habit. And she was correct, YOU are so special. Keep the memories coming….



    chromedust
    November 3, 2014 at 4:32 am
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    Evelyn- I’m so happy that so many remember Hannah. Thank you for reading and your wonderful comment!!!

Jim Brittain
November 3, 2014 at 3:24 am
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Thank you for story on Hannah. She would walk by our home every now and then. Dad said she came to Pike county in a covered Wagon, and don’t dough it. As she walked by some times I would go walk with her for a bit. She never said to much, but what she did say you could take to the bank. A great memory form my childhood as well, thank you Eddie.



    chromedust
    November 3, 2014 at 4:38 am
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    Jim- I’m so happy that you and so many remember Hannah so fondly. I’ve thought and talked about her for so many years. She always said walking kept her alive. She was ahead of her time. Thank you for reading and sharing your voice and memories on Farm Stories.

donna dyer
November 3, 2014 at 4:17 am
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So poignant. Evokes memories of many old folks from my past in Otwell. Can’t wait to read all you have in store for Farm Stories.



    chromedust
    November 3, 2014 at 4:44 am
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    Donna- I’ve talked about Hannah for all my adult life. When I moved to DC and a client in my chair would ask me to tell them a Farm Story Hannah was always a story they loved. I didn’t have any idea so many from home would not only remember her but also be reminded of similar wonderful, colorful folks we grew up with. Thank you for reading and sharing your voice on Farm Stories…

Bruce Barton
November 3, 2014 at 6:27 am
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Eddie, I must say I enjoyed your writing about the softer side of your father. My words for my dad are generally filled with angst as we disagree on many things. We have just different views of the world yet there is a side of him that makes me smile. He fills me with joy many times and I must remember to celebrate that side of him.

This recall of Hannah is fantastic. So detailed that I was walking with Hannah. Who know what she was thinking or of why she sought you out. It’s amazing that she did. We the student is ready the teacher appears, you the student needed her at that moment in time. Her words have carried you through to today!

Bravo on this piece Eddie.



chromedust
November 3, 2014 at 3:39 pm
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Bruce- It’s sometimes very difficult to look at and acknowledge different sides of people. Especially those who have been unkind or who our views differ so greatly. For me personally I wish I could remember more of the other sides of my father… I know it existed but I was witness to very little of it… His effort to ‘Toughen Me Up’ wouldn’t allow… Sad…

I was so happy that so many responded to Hannah. I believe we all have special, colorful folk that have great impact on us in our youth. Making them unforgettable….. Thank you for reading and giving your voice to Farm Stories!!!!



Daun Robertson
November 3, 2014 at 4:00 pm
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My goodness it’s been awhile since I’ve heard anyone talk of Hannah. Thanks for bringing back a childhood memory. I’ve not thought of her in awhile but don’t think I will ever forget her. I remember her walking past our house on the pike state road. I always thought she looked so little. Probably because she was always stupped so far over with both arms crossed behind her back. Once in awhile you would see her bend over to pick up something. I remember asking what she was picking up? And the story from Dad that it was cigarettes. I can’t remember her face because of the bonnets she always wore. She always reminded me of my Great-Aunt Tobb who always wore a bonnet and smoked an old metal pipe which I still have with the last of her tobbaco she kept in an old Denny Moore stew can. I love the picture that you used, the over size bonnet and safety pins instead of buttons. Thanks so much Eddie for the picture and story. (Now I’ve got to have Dad show me where her house use to be).



    chromedust
    November 4, 2014 at 2:26 am
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    Daun- For years I talked about Hannah to clients in my chair while I cut or colored their hair. They would ask for a Farm Story and she was a great one. They loved hearing about her. I’m so glad I helped nudge your memory of her. She was so tiny and I thought her arms looked so long the way she crossed them behind her back. She would pick up cigarettes and take the left over tobacco from them. Love the you still have your Great Aunts tobacco!!! Amazing!!!

    Thank you so much for reading Farm Stories. Means so much to me….

Kerry
November 4, 2014 at 12:16 am
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Beautiful story: an interesting woman with an incredible gift. Making someone feel special
Thank you for writing!



    chromedust
    November 4, 2014 at 2:28 am
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    Kerry- I have always loved telling the story of Hannah. She was such a colorful character from my childhood. I thought so interesting that she claimed walking kept her alive and well. She was ahead of her time in that respect.

    Thank you so much for reading and lending your voice to Farm Stories. Means so much to me!!!!

Deborah Hansen
November 5, 2014 at 4:48 am
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I have to echo Brad – AWESOME!!! Eddie – I am deeply affected by your writing – it really reaches right in and grabs me. You are amazingly gifted.



    chromedust
    November 5, 2014 at 5:36 pm
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    Debbie- Can’t tell you how much your words mean to me. Coming from someone who was my friend from back in the day. Thank you for reading and sharing your voice with Farm Stories!!!

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